Junk Raft: An Ocean Voyage and a Rising Tide of Activism to Fight Plastic Pollution

News media brought the “Great Pacific Garbage Patch” into the public consciousness. But when Marcus Eriksen cofounded the 5 Gyres Institute with his wife, Anna Cummins, and set out to study the world’s oceans with hundreds of volunteers, they discovered a “plastic smog” of microscopic debris that permeates our oceans globally, defying simple clean-up efforts. Link to book.


Plastic Ocean: How a Sea Captain’s Chance Discovery Launched a Determined Quest to Save the Oceans

Plastic Ocean: How a Sea Captain’s Chance Discovery Launched a Determined Quest to Save the Oceans
In 1997, environmentalist Charles Moore discovered the world’s largest collection of floating trash—the Great Pacific Garbage Patch—while sailing from Hawaii to California. Moore was shocked by the level of pollution that he saw. And in the last 20 years, it’s only gotten worse. Link to book

Plastic Ocean: How a Sea Captain's Chance Discovery Launched a Determined Quest to Save the Oceans

 


One Plastic Bag: Isatou Ceesay and the Recycling Women of the Gambia

Plastic bags are cheap and easy to use. But what happens when a bag breaks or is no longer needed? In Njau, Gambia, people simply dropped the bags and went on their way. One plastic bag became two. Then ten. Then a hundred. Link to book

One Plastic Bag: Isatou Ceesay and the Recycling Women of the Gambia

Plastic, Ahoy!: Investigating the Great Pacific Garbage Patch

Plastic: it’s used to make everything from drink bottles and bags to toys and toothbrushes. But what happens when it ends up where it doesn’t belong– like in the Pacific Ocean? How does it affect ocean life? Is it dangerous? And exactly how much is out there? A team of researchers went on a scientific expedition to find out. They explored the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, where millions of pieces of plastic have collected. The plastic has drifted there from rivers, beaches, and ocean traffic all over the world. Most of it has broken down into tiny pieces the size of confetti. For nearly three weeks at sea, researchers gathered bits of plastic and ocean organisms. These samples helped them learn more about the effects of plastic in the ocean. Follow along on the expedition to find out how scientists studied the Garbage Patch– and what alarming discoveries they made. Link to book


1, 2, 3 Who is Cleaning The Sea?

Inspired by powerful visuals of ocean pollution, this book will teach your child not only numbers and how to count but also the importance of taking care of our environment. Children will love learning how little changes they make can protect our planet. Link to book


The Adventures of a Plastic Bottle: A Story About Recycling

Learn about recycling from a new perspective!  Peek into this diary of a plastic bottle as it goes on a journey from the refinery plant, to the manufacturing line, to the store shelf, to a garbage can, and finally to a recycling plant where it emerges into it’s new life…as a fleece jacket! Link to book


What a Waste: Trash, Recycling, and Protecting our Planet

This environmental book will teach young ecologists about how our actions affect planet Earth. Discover shocking facts about the waste we produce and where it goes. Did you know that every single plastic toothbrush ever made still exists? Or that there’s a floating mass of garbage twice the size of Texas drifting around the Pacific Ocean? Link to book


Plastic Soup: An Atlas of Ocean Pollution

Plastics have transformed every aspect of our lives. Yet the very properties that make them attractive—they are cheap to make, light, and durable—spell disaster when trash makes its way into the environment. Plastic Soup: An Atlas of Ocean Pollution is a beautifully-illustrated survey of the plastics clogging our seas, their impacts on wildlife and people around the world, and inspirational initiatives designed to tackle the problem. Link to book